Media coverage
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March 27, 2015 -- Interview and review of French version of Five Myths in the Belgian weekly Le Vif by Quentin Noirfalisse.
Ward Wilson: “Si on considére les armes nucléaires pour ce qu’elles sont, à savoir de outils vieux de 70 ans, passés de mode, dangereux, avec de capacités limitées, et peu utiles, on fera un véritable progrés.”

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March 5, 2015 -- Interview with Jean-Marie Collin and brief review of French version of Five Myths in the Belgian free paper Metro.
“Dan son livre “Armes Nucleeaires : et si elle ne servaient à rien? Ward Wilson ébranle nos schémas de pensée sur l’armement et la dissuasion nucléaires. Après avoir analysé différentes crises nucléaires au moyen d’archives déclassifiées, il déconstruit cinq mythes attribués aux armes de destruction massive.”

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March 2, 2014 -- Op-ed "Bombing Hiroshima, Nagasaki was a Crime" by Debasish Mitra
"American historians are clearly divided on how central was the role of the bombs that destroyed Hiroshima and Nagasaki in coercing Japan to surrender unconditionally. For the first time in 1965, historian Gar Alperovitz challenged the American claims and drilled in massive holes in the narrative. The bombs did not beat Japan, says Ward Wilson.

And his arguments in favour of his assertion are simply unequivocal. In the three weeks leading up to the attack on Hiroshima, the picture in Japan was that of utter desolation, destruction and defeat."

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January 21, 2014 -- Op-ed "The 'Nuclear Deterrence Works' Fantasy" by Rizwan Ashgar
"Ward Wilson, a famous nuclear expert and director of the Rethinking Nuclear Weapons Project, is of the view that nuclear deterrence is an unsound basis for the national security policy because it is neither as effective at political persuasion nor as capable of influencing military conflicts as many proponents of nuclear weapons would have us believe. For total reliance on the nuclear deterrence strategy it has to be prefect but historical records show that deterrence could work only in a few cases. Even a single case of failure has the potential to lead to a nuclear war. More alarmingly, deterrence threats, due to their inherently uncertain nature, sometimes lead enemy nations to behave in ways that are quite inimical to achieving the goal of deterring aggression."

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November 29, 2013 -- Review "The Four Straw Men of the Apocalypse" by Bruno Tertrais
"Nuclear deterrence is the ultimate abstract construct. Because there has never been a nuclear war per se, strategising about nuclear weapons is by nature a hypothetical exercise. Because it is logically impossible to prove a negative, demonstrating the effectiveness of nuclear weapons as war-prevention instruments is a difficult enterprise. Nuclear deterrence is also associated with absolutes. Conceived as weapons of resistance against totalitarianism, nuclear arms quickly became associated with nothing less than the survival of the human race. For these reasons, nuclear strategy is fertile ground for analogies grounded in spirituality. The first nuclear test was called Trinity; its success elicited a recitation of the Bhagavad Gita by its creator, and quotes from the Book of Revelation by observers. As early as the 1950s, the idea of a nuclear war was associated with Armageddon, the final battle between good and evil according to The Bible. The first nuclear detonations were called an original sin. Time and again, certain Evangelical Christians, Orthodox Jews and Shia Muslims have found echoes of their own beliefs in such images.

Emotionally and culturally supercharged as it is, then, does nuclear deterrence still connect with reality? Might it just be based on a set of fallacies or myths?"

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"Ward Wilson es miembro senior en el Centro de Estudios James Martin para la No Proliferación del Instituto Monterey de Estudios Internacionales. Ha hablado en la Cámara de los Comunes en el Reino Unido, la Universidad de Princeton, la Universidad de Stanford, las Naciones Unidas, la Escuela de Guerra Naval, el Instituto Brookings, la Universidad de Chicago, la Universidad de Georgetown, Centro de Estudios Estratégicos y Estudios Internacionales de Los Alamos, el Centro Stimson, así como otros. Ha publicado trabajos en International Security, The Nonproliferation Review, Vie World Today, The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, entre otros."

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May 22, 2013 -- "Nuclear Winter of Our Discontent" by Mark Thompson
"Always interesting when the Army starts poking around the nation’s nuclear stockpile – seeing as the service is no longer a big player in the atomic realm – to see if atomic weapons still make sense.

Ward Wilson isn’t a soldier – he’s a senior fellow at the Center for Nonproliferation Studies at the Monterey Institute of International Studies – but his musing on the topic appears in the latest issue of Parameters, the Army’s professional journal.

By re-studying the U.S. nuclear bombing of Japan that ended World War II in 1945, and the brush with World War III that 1962’s Cuban missile crisis represented, Wilson tries to revamp our understanding of the utility of nuclear weapons."

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Spring 2013 -- "Disarmament and other Nuclear Norms" by Sir Lawrence Freedman
" . . . While Snow worried about the non-use norm inevitably breaking, others have worried that deference is simply is simply not a good enough reason to maintain nuclear arsenals. As a recent example of this, we can consider arguments by Ward Wilson of the Monterey Institute of International Studies, who explains that if proof exists that nuclear deterrence does not work, then disarmament is the only recourse. Unless a "stronger rationale for keeping these dangerous weapons can be contrived," he says of deterrence, "perhaps they should be banned." Wilson also challenges the claim that the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki played a crucial role in Japan's surrender in 1945; rather, he says, it was the entry of the Soviets into the war. The atom bomb was just a convenient excuse for Japanese leaders, "allowing them to blame defeat on this 'miracle' weapon."

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January 13, 2013 -- "On the Uselessness of Nuclear Weapons" by Ashutosh Jogalekar
"Two foundational beliefs have colored our views of nuclear weapons since the end of World War 2; one, that they were essential or at least very significant for ending the war, and two, that they have been and will continue to be linchpins of deterrence. These beliefs have, in one way or another, guided all our thinking about these mythic creations. Ward Wilson who is at the Monterey Institute of International Studies wants to demolish these and other myths about nukes in a new book titled “5 Myths about Nuclear Weapons“, and I have seen few volumes which deliver their message so effectively in such few words. Below are Wilson’s thoughts about the two dominant nuclear myths interspersed with a few of my own.

Nuclear weapons were paramount in ending World War 2″.

This is where it all begins. And the post facto rationalization certainly bolsters the analysis; brilliant scientists worked on a fearsome weapon in a race against the Nazis, and when the Nazis were defeated, handed it over to world leaders who used to it bring a swift end to a most horrible conflict. Psychologically it fits into a satisfying and noble narrative."

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January 11, 2013 -- Book review "Rethinking the Unthinkable" by Bill Keller
"One of the striking features of our long coexistence with nuclear weapons is how the fear of them has receded. In the 1950s and ’60s, when Hiroshima and Nagasaki were vivid memories, these novel and monstrous weapons loomed over our politics and penetrated our popular culture. The nuclear doomsday thriller “On the Beach” filled us with visceral dread. The dark satire of “Dr. Strangelove” played on real concerns. The laughter provoked by the twisted genius of Tom Lehrer was nervous laughter:

And we will all go together when we go,
Ev’ry Hottentot and ev’ry Eskimo.
When the air becomes uranious,
And we will all go simultaneous . . .
Yes we all will go together when we go.
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